Provision for a no-deal Brexit

Transitional labour and social insurance regulations

The German government is taking action to cushion the consequences of Brexit. The second chamber of the German parliament, the Bundesrat, has now approved the transitional labour and social insurance regulations, as well as provisions for student loans and naturalisation. The law will come into effect immediately, should the United Kingdom leave the EU without an agreement.

With the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union the legal basis for common social security regulations will cease to apply. This will apply to services relating to health, long-term nursing care, old age pensions, dependents’pensions, invalidity, accidents at work, occupational disease and unemployment.

This act of parliament will put in place transitional regulations for German citizens living and working in the UK and UK citizens living and working in Germany. These individuals are not to be disadvantaged in the field of social security, even after a disorderly withdrawal.

Social insurance cover will remain in place

Existing social insurance cover and years of contributions will continue to apply. This will apply to all those who were insured under British or German statutory health, long-term nursing care, unemployment, old age pension and accident insurance schemes.

The legislation also contains transitional regulations covering employment promotion, part-time working for those approaching retirement and hiring out workers.

Student loans (BAföG) will still be paid

German trainees and students in the UK and vice versa will not have to break off their training or degree courses. They will continue to receive BAföG student loans until the end of their course.

Naturalisation

Individuals applying for naturalisation, who have not received a definitive response before any unregulated withdrawal of the UK will still be entitled to retain both passports. This will be accepted to ensure that nobody is disadvantaged merely because it took longer to process their application.

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